redwoodcones
This site refers to the three types of Redwood by the names commonly used in the U.K:
Giant Redwood Giant Redwood / Giant Sequoia / Wellingtonia Sequoiadendron giganteum
Coast Redwood Coast Redwood / Redwood Sequoia sempervirens
Dawn Redwood Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides
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Luke's U.S. Visit
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Luke's U.S. Visit
General Grant
Luke has done a fantastic job of locating Giant Redwoods in his home town in Haslemere over the last year, so it was great to include details of his trip to see the real giants in America. Each of Luke's photographs (aside from the bear!) have people next to the tree to give an idea of the sheer size of these monsters. Such is the scale of these Giant Redwoods (Sequoia to the Americans) that you might have to look very carefully to spot the person.

It would be good to hear from others who make the trip across the pond.
General Grant
"The General Grant is the second largest tree in the world by volume with a girth of 33m and maximum diameter at ground being 12.5m or 41ft."
The President
"The President is the 3rd largest tree with huge branches up to 2.5m diameter."
Monroe
"The Monroe is the 10th largest tree."
17th Largest Tree
"17th largest tree."
29metres girth
"29 Metres Girth"
 
Lightning Struck "This was the 2nd largest tree with a girth of 30.8m but it was struck by lightning. If you look closely you can see me at the bottom."



Bear

"A wild bear we saw."


Finally, the picture on the right shows a comparison between the General Grant and a tree found in Haslemere by Luke (named "King Kong" by him). The British tree shown in the inset is among the broadest in the U.K. Despite this it is literally dwarfed by the American monster.

It is interesting to wonder whether any of the Giant Sequoia here in the U.K. will reach the size and age of their American cousins (or perhaps that should be great-grandads).
Grant and King Kong
First Encounters