redwoodcones
This site refers to the three types of Redwood by the names commonly used in the U.K:
Giant Redwood Giant Redwood / Giant Sequoia / Wellingtonia Sequoiadendron giganteum
Coast Redwood Coast Redwood / Redwood Sequoia sempervirens
Dawn Redwood Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides
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Redwood Tree Saplings for Sale
As an enthusiast growing Redwood trees I decided to offer some for sale as a means of offsetting the expense of running the web site and growing and planting out these magnificent trees. Those listed on this page are saplings that are excess to my own planting out needs.

Delivery in the Essex area only (for cost of petrol), or you will need to collect them yourself from my home town of Rayleigh, South East Essex (SS6). (You can lay the trees down in the back of your car as shown below). The important point is that I have no facility for posting trees.

Heights do not include the pot size, in other words it is the size of the tree from the base of its stem to the tip of the leader.

Planting is best done during early autumn to very early spring. It can be done at any time of year, but early to late summer planting is risky if you are not able to water the tree several times a week during dry periods for the first season. This is because its roots won't have grown sufficiently into the ground to find their own water supply.

Email with the reference number of the trees you wish to buy (and details of your location if you want me to deliver to you in the Essex area) to:

ron@redwoodworld.co.uk


Common Name(s)

Latin Name
Reference
Number

Height

Price
Click on Picture
for bigger view

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 440 1m 160
This sapling is in a large 50 litre pot with handles. It has been grown from a seed taken from a tree near the Windmill in Upminster, Essex and is a superb specimen.

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 431 0.97m 75

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 449 0.85m 100
This sapling is in a generous sized 35 litre pot with handles. This tree can be kept in the pot for another year or so if prefered.

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 476 0.8m 80

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 422 0.9m 55

Giant Redwood
Wellingtonia
Giant Sequoia


Sequoiadendron giganteum 455 0.65m 80

Coast Redwood

Sequoia sempervirens 909 2m 60

This specimen is in excellent health but it did have a brief period of dryness last year which caused some browing to the tips of the old foliage. However, if you zoom into the large size picture you can see tufts of fresh bright green foliage are bursting forth. The tree also has two leaders at the top foot or so of growth, one of these ideally should be clipped off once it is settled in after the first year.

This sapling is in a generous sized 35 litre pot with handles.

Coast Redwood

Sequoia sempervirens 474 1.48m 50


Coast Redwood

Sequoia sempervirens 469 1.3m 65


Dawn Redwood

Metasequoia glyptostroboides 490 1.3m 75

Dawn Redwood

Metasequoia glyptostroboides 495 2m 90

Dawn Redwood

Metasequoia glyptostroboides 486 2m 100
RESERVED

Dawn Redwood

Metasequoia glyptostroboides 446 3m 80
RESERVED

Giant RedwoodCoast RedwoodDawn Redwood Giant RedwoodCoast RedwoodDawn Redwood Giant RedwoodCoast RedwoodDawn Redwood Giant RedwoodCoast RedwoodDawn Redwood
An ideal present, but remember - a tree is for life and not just for Christmas



 Here is a brief description of each of the types of Redwood tree and the conditions they prefer.
Giant RedwoodGiant Redwood aka Wellingtonia / Giant Sequoia / Sequoiadendron giganteum Top of page
Giant Redwood
Giant Redwood
This is my favourite of the Redwoods and is of course the most massive of all trees, although you would need to live for thousands of years to see it at its most immense.

As a young tree it will have a highly attractive conical form with reasonably dense foliage. As the decades go by it will grow to become a majestic landmark tree, and will reveal its reddish brown trunk and wonderful soft bark. The rate of growth is not as dramatic or over-powering as you might expect, perhaps five or six years after planting out it may be around ten to fifteen feet tall.

If you are concerned about trees being blown over in gales then this is certainly a tree for you. It is one of the sturdiest of all trees, they rarely topple due to high winds. A good example of how they ride out the fiercest storms can be seen in this picture taken at Emmett's House after the 1987 storm. They will grow on most soils but have a preference for well drained ground. They will not survive on ground that is regularly water logged or boggy. A little flooding though, for a few weeks every couple of years for example, will not kill it as can be seen here.

Remember not to over-water Giant Redwoods, they don't like sitting in soggy compost for too long and are happy to run quite dry between waterings. Avoid spraying water on the foliage as this can encourage fungal growth on very young saplings of Giant Redwood.
Here are some fine examples that can be found in the Essex/Suffolk area:
Chelmsford - Hylands Park
Colchester - Acland House
Danbury - Graces Lane
Great Baddow - High Street
Great Dunmow - Fire Station
Havering-atte-Bower - Havering Park
Upminster Windmill
Lowestoft - Somerleyton Hall
Coast Redwood Coast Redwood aka Californian Redwood / Sequoia sempervirens Top of page
Coast Redwood
Coast Redwood
The Coast Redwood is the tallest of all trees, not quite as massive as the Giant Redwood since the trunk, although it will grow very wide in time, does not have quite the same girth. It has a less tidy form than the Giant Redwood and the bark is not quite as soft. Nevertheless it is in fact the tree that the Americans refer more frequently as the Redwood. In my experience the rate of growth, particularly vertically, is far greater than the Giant Redwood.

The Coast Redwood is far more tolerant of boggy conditions than the Giant, and correspondingly is a little less tolerant of extremely dry mid-summers. It is worth bearing this in mind when choosing your location; best to avoid places that become desperately dry dust bowls in the summer.

If you do not plant out the tree straight away, do not rely on rainfall during the hot summer months as this will not usually be sufficient to soak the pot. In mid summer the pot will need watering every day. They like plenty of water and unlike the Giant Redwood, these trees can have their foliage sprayed whilst watering.
Here are some fine examples that can be found in the Essex/Suffolk area:
Colchester - Castle Park
Halstead - Broaks Wood
Ipswich - Playford Road
Lowestoft - Somerleyton Hall
Dawn Redwood Dawn Redwood aka Metasequoia glyptostroboides Top of page
Dawn Redwood
Dawn Redwood
The Dawn Redwood, being a smaller tree than the other two Redwoods, is often considered as being more suitable for the average garden. It has a more delicate and very attractive foliage and being deciduous it provides a stunning orange/golden display in the autumn before the leaves drop. Bear in mind that despite its fine and delicate form, this will still grow into a fairly substantial tree (although it can be clipped to control its growth).

It will grow in most soil conditions and additionally it is tolerant of very damp conditions, making it ideal for those hard to fill boggy areas. It it often mistaken for the Swamp Cypress which actually grows in marshy areas.


If you do not plant out the tree straight away, do not rely on rainfall during the hot summer months as this will not usually be sufficient to soak the pot. In mid summer the pot will need watering every day. They like plenty of water and unlike the Giant Redwood, these trees can have their foliage sprayed whilst watering.

They do not cope well with a completely dry pot and they will wilt very quickly under such conditions, but if a disaster strikes do not discard the tree because, even if it loses all its foliage, it may recover in the following spring and form a new leader. I have resurrected a number of Dawn Redwood that suffered such neglect while I was away on holiday and completely recovered the following year.
Here are some fine examples that can be found in the Essex/Suffolk area:
Colchester - Castle Park
Colchester - Sports Ground
Dedham - St Mary the Virgin church


 
Contact Us

Please email with the reference number of the tree(s) you wish to buy
and details of your location if you want me to deliver to you in the Essex area to:

ron@redwoodworld.co.uk or
redwoodron61@yahoo.co.uk

I do NOT pass email addresses on to any other party.


Tree Delivery / Collection


Please note though that if you buy some trees I can only deliver in the Essex area (for cost of petrol),
or you will need to collect them yourself from my home town of Rayleigh, South East Essex (SS6).
You can lay the trees down in the back of your car as shown below.


You are welcome to collect your tree from my home address in Rayleigh, South East Essex (SS6). Alternatively I am willing to deliver to most areas in Essex for a small charge to cover the petrol. Delivery or collection would have to be during evenings or weekends, as I have a day job!


Transporting even quite tall saplings can be quite straightforward. They do not have to travel upright in your car, just measure the amount of room you have from the end of the hatchback to the front. It doesn't cause any harm to the tree, they are pretty resilient. I have successfully used this method for many a delivery!


Finding and Photographing

All that is needed to find Giant Redwood trees (Wellingtonia) is a good pair of eyes and a good map.